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San Francisco Chronicle: Fall Back in Love with Your Partner

Celebrate More than Valentine's - Fall Back in Love with Your Partner

SF Gate / San Francisco Chronicle
(PRWEB) February 11, 2012

Couples should celebrate more than just Valentine's Day next week; marriage week is February 7-14th and in honor of the institution Dr. Bonnie Eaker Weil has tips for both singles and couples on how to fall in love and stay in love.

Couples should celebrate more than just Valentine's Day next week; marriage week is February 7-14th and in honor of the institution Dr. Bonnie Eaker Weil has tips for both singles and couples on how to fall in love and stay in love.

  • Learn the proper skills and dialogue. Dr. Bonnie has developed a method of communication called Smart Heart Skills and Dialogue.This provides a safe place where each person can feel comfortable talking about their fears and frustrations. "These types of habits can be the glue that helps to create passion in a relationship, even during and spite of disagreements and conflict," says Dr. Bonnie. She uses it as a way to help couples move beyond the anger and blame that typically is placed when an argument or disagreement comes to a stalemate.

  • Recreate the "falling in love" chemicals. The "cuddle hormone" Oxytocin is what people feel when they fall in love - it's what bonds people to their partners and makes them feel safe and cared for. Something as simple as a 30 second kiss releases Oxytocin recreates that bond and is a guaranteed tension reducer. In the book Make Up Don't Break Up, Dr. Bonnie discusses these and other techniques that help keep the spark in a relationship, including the best and most beneficial way to engage in that hug or kiss to make sure couples get the maximum benefits.

  • Fight fair. In the beginning of a relationship there often isn't any conflict but as things progress and life settles into a routine, it is commonplace for couples to fight; that's not a bad thing observes Dr. Bonnie. Rather, it's how couples fight that makes a difference. Research shows that it's things like tone of voice, words couples use, and whether or not they hear each other out, that contributes to how effective and productive fighting can be.

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http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/g/a/2012/02/11/prweb9183260.DTL

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